Birmingham Works May/June 2010 : Page 25

Managing Outside the Lines First, Break All the Rules was written by Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman of the Gallup Organization. The book is based on a 20-year study that aimed to determine what the world’s best managers were doing to create a loyal, productive, and truly happy workforce. My first thought after reading the inside cover was that the book would study the managers themselves, but Gallup actually surveyed more than 100,000 employees from 24 different companies representing 12 distinct sectors of the workforce. Every industry - from restaurants to banking - was polled to develop what the authors claim to be the most comprehensive management study ever created. The book starts by outlining the study’s findings (overviews include such topics as the five key elements that drive employee retention), then expands into small case studies of how successful managers create a thriving work environment. As befits a book written by two Gallup employees, Break All the Rules is full of poll-derived details, yet it still manages to be a very readable work. The authors make a solid effort to relate the Gallup results to real-world applications, but as I read the book I nevertheless sensed a disconnect between the survey results and the kind of practical, constructive advice that might be expected from a colleague or managerial coach. That having been said, THE EXECUTIVE LIBRARY By Kyle Martin the survey results are often quite fascinating and should prove useful for anyone managing a business. Break All the Rules is full of open-ended questions designed to get the reader thinking, and the book closes with an interesting set of appendices that provide many of the specifics from the Gallup study. One section that caught my eye was the discussion centering on how to choose the right person for the job. One of the biggest challenges a manager faces is putting the right people in the ight roles. Buckingham and Coffman bring a great deal of insight to this issue; the authors discuss otential interview questions for managers that can elicit the kind of responses that management needs in order to truly evaluate potential hires. I found this section of the book to be very interesting and helpful. For anyone wishing to gain a greater insight into successful management, First, Break All The Rules is definitely worth a look. Kyle Martin is an avid reader with a particular fondness for books focused on business, leadership, and success. When he’s not reading (or chasing his one year- old son), Kyle is a Financial Advisor with Morgan Keegan & Company, Inc. Managing anaging Outside the Lines First, Break A ide the Lines First, Break All the Rules was written by Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman of the Gallup Organization. The book is based on a 20-year study that aimed to determine what the world’s best managers were doing to create a loyal, productive, and truly happy workforce. My first thought after reading the inside cover was that the book would study the managers themselves, but Gallup actually surveyed more than 100,000 employees from 24 different companies representing 12 distinct sectors of the workforce. Every industry - from restaurants to banking - was polled to develop what the authors claim to be the most comprehensive management study ever created. The book starts by outlining the study’s findings (overviews include such topics as the five key elements that drive employee retention), then expands into small case studies of how successful managers create a thriving work environment. As befits a book written by two Gallup employees, Break All the Rules is full of poll-derived details, yet it still manages to be a very readable work. The authors make a solid effort to relate the Gallup results to real-world applications, but as I read the book I nevertheless sensed a disconnect between the survey results and the kind of practical, constructive advice that might be expected from a colleague or managerial coach. That having been said, THE EXECUTIVE LIBRARY By Kyle Martin the survey results are often quite fascinating and should prove useful for anyone managing a business. Break All the Rules is full of open-ended questions designed to get the reader thinking, and the book closes with an interesting set of appendices that provide many of the specifics from the Gallup study. One section that caught my eye was the discussion centering on how to choose the right person for the job. One of the biggest challenges a manager faces is putting the right people in the ight roles. Buckingham and Coffman bring a great deal of insight to this issue; the authors discuss otential interview questions for managers that can elicit the kind of responses that management needs in order to truly evaluate potential hires. I found this section of the book to be very interesting and helpful. For anyone wishing to gain a greater insight into successful management, First, Break All The Rules is definitely worth a look. Kyle Martin is an avid reader with a particular fondness for books focused on business, leadership, and success. When he’s not reading (or chasing his one year- old son), Kyle is a Financial Advisor with Morgan Keegan & Company, Inc. BHAMWORKS.com BHAMWORKS.com 25

Executive Library: Managing Outside the Lines

Kyle Martin

First, Break All the Rules was written by Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman of the Gallup Organization. The book is based on a 20-year study that aimed to determine what the world’s best managers were doing to create a loyal, productive, and truly happy workforce.<br /> <br /> My first thought after reading the inside cover was that the book would study the managers themselves, but Gallup actually surveyed more than 100,000 employees from 24 different companies representing 12 distinct sectors of the workforce. Every industry - from restaurants to banking - was polled to develop what the authors claim to be the most comprehensive management study ever created. <br /> <br /> The book starts by outlining the study’s findings (overviews include such topics as the five key elements that drive employee retention), then expands into small case studies of how successful managers create a thriving work environment.<br /> <br /> As befits a book written by two Gallup employees, Break All the Rules is full of poll-derived details, yet it still manages to be a very readable work. The authors make a solid effort to relate the Gallup results to real-world applications, but as I read the book I nevertheless sensed a disconnect between the survey results and the kind of practical, constructive advice that might be expected from a colleague or managerial coach. That having been said, the survey results are often quite fascinating and should prove useful for anyone managing a business. <br /> <br /> Break All the Rules is full of open-ended questions designed to get the reader thinking, and the book closes with an interesting set of appendices that provide many of the specifics from the Gallup study. One section that caught my eye was the discussion centering on how to choose the right person for the job. One of the biggest challenges a manager faces is putting the right people in the right roles. Buckingham and Coffman bring a great deal of insight to this issue; the authors discuss potential interview questions for managers that can elicit the kind of responses that management needs in order to truly evaluate potential hires. I found this section of the book to be very interesting and helpful. <br /> <br /> For anyone wishing to gain a greater insight into successful management, First, Break All The Rules is definitely worth a look. <br /> <br /> Kyle Martin is an avid reader with a particular fondness for books focused on business, leadership, and success. When he’s not reading (or chasing his one year old son), Kyle is a Financial Advisor with Morgan Keegan & Company, Inc.<br />

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