Ontario Technologist NovDec2016 : Page 6

OACETT IN ACTION ASSOCIATION NEWS FROM AROUND THE PROVINCE Celebrating 25, 40 and 50 years of membership! This listing represents certified members who reached their milestone between August 11, 2016 and October 31, 2016. 25-year members Suzanne Alfano, C.E.T. David Baer, C.E.T. Simon Barnes, C.E.T. Kurt Belair, C.E.T. Scott Birmingham, C.E.T. Denis Bois, C.E.T. Joe Borges, C.E.T. Ronald William Braun, C.E.T. D. Gregory Brien, C.E.T. James Brown, C.E.T. Paul Carriere, C.E.T. Romeo Celis Jr., C.E.T. Robert Chappell, C.E.T. Allan Cobham, C.E.T. Serge Cote, C.E.T. David Courteaux, C.E.T. Douglas Dally, A.Sc.T. John De Boer, C.E.T. John De Jong, C.Tech. Rolando Dela Cruz, C.E.T. Andronico Delos Reyes, C.E.T. Marcel Desmeules, C.E.T. Louis Dewinter, C.E.T. Harry Doering, C.E.T. Hector Duborgel, C.E.T. Marvin Dupuis, C.E.T. Ronald Ferguson, C.E.T. Barry Fletcher, A.Sc.T. David Ford, C.E.T. Antonio Francisco, C.Tech. Giovanni Frisoni, C.E.T. Sergio Galido, C.E.T. Christopher Grimaldi, C.E.T. Collin Hall, C.E.T. Daniel Hansen, C.E.T. Brian Harnock, C.E.T. Bradley Harsell, C.E.T. Feraydoon Hassan-Shafiee, C.E.T. David Hudson, C.E.T. Michael Ignaczewski, C.E.T. Paul Irwin, C.E.T. Selvarajah Jebanesan, C.E.T. Christine Johnston, C.E.T. Patricia Kennedy, C.E.T. Art Kreeft, C.E.T. Edward Kwan, C.E.T. Blaine Larock, C.E.T. Richard Lewis, C.E.T. Pius Liu, C.E.T. Michael Lovell, C.E.T. Darryl Lucier, A.Sc.T. Timothy Machuletz, C.E.T. Narendra Makwana, C.E.T. Aldo Marcuzzi, C.E.T. Philip Mayfield, A.Sc.T. Kim McEwen, C.E.T. Kenneth McKinnon, C.E.T. Carmen Mignelli, C.Tech. Danny Monteith, C.E.T. Jamie Monteith, C.Tech. Michael Morrow, C.E.T. David Mundy, C.E.T. Ann Newman, C.E.T. Anthony O’Brien, C.E.T. Hans Oehling, C.Tech. Trevor Owen, C.E.T. Mark Parker, C.E.T. Valerie Pearcey, C.Tech. Alan Perras, C.E.T. Colin Pilon, C.E.T. Danny Pozzobon, C.E.T. Alex Quijalvo, C.E.T. Stephen Renwick, C.E.T. William Richardson, C.E.T. Mark Rolland, C.E.T. Ronald Rowe, C.E.T. Ashraf Samuel, C.E.T. Dev Sandhu, C.E.T. Domenic Sanzo, C.E.T. Daniel Schembri, C.E.T. David Scrace, C.E.T. Paul Sobiera, C.E.T. Claudio Spalvieri, C.E.T. Raymond St. George, C.Tech. Dezso Szeredi, C.E.T. Danny Tam, C.E.T. Phillip Taylor, C.Tech. John Ticki, C.E.T. David Tripodi, C.E.T. Geoffrey Vanderveen, C.E.T. Bruce Waldron, C.E.T. David Walker, A.Sc.T. Donald Zehr, C.E.T. Stephen McCool, C.E.T. A. Mikolajewski, C.E.T. Robert Mortimer, C.E.T. Robert Pirocchi, C.E.T. Tomeshwer Prasad, C.E.T., CST Dennis Price, C.E.T. John Schmidt, C.E.T. Joseph Seelall, C.E.T. Paul Seibel, C.E.T. Marcelo Villanueva, C.E.T. Paul Whitehouse, C.E.T. John Wysman, C.E.T. 50-year members Robert Bettridge, C.E.T. Manfred Brudlo, C.E.T. Floyd Clapp, C.E.T. Henk De Graauw, C.E.T. Donald Ferguson, C.E.T. Brian Hammond, C.E.T. Donald Holmes, C.E.T. Theofanis Karagounis, C.E.T. Benjamin Korec, C.E.T. George Krakana, C.E.T. Douglas Kuhn, C.E.T. R. Madan, C.E.T. Frank Odorico, C.E.T. G. Potts, C.E.T. Gerard Thorpe, C.E.T. Jeffrey Tristram, C.E.T. J. Douglas Truman, C.E.T. Douglas Watt, C.E.T. Edward Williams, C.E.T. Colin Wilson, C.E.T. Gordon Young, C.E.T. 40-year members Thomas Avey, C.E.T. Gervais Clermont, C.E.T. Bruno Covi, C.E.T. Haslyne Crandon, C.E.T. Michael Drewe, C.E.T. Randolph Edmead, C.E.T. Gordon Florence, C.E.T. Marvin Graves, C.E.T. Murray Hawn, C.E.T. Walter Jankun, C.E.T. E. Katsirdakis, C.E.T. Khalil Khan, C.E.T. Akbar Lalani, C.E.T. Robert Leishman, C.E.T. 6 The Ontario Technologist • www.oacett.org

OACETT In Action

Celebrating 25, 40 and 50 years of membership!

This listing represents certified members who reached their milestone between August 11, 2016 and October 31, 2016

25-year members

Suzanne Alfano, C.E.T.
David Baer, C.E.T.
Simon Barnes, C.E.T.
Kurt Belair, C.E.T.
Scott Birmingham, C.E.T.
Denis Bois, C.E.T.
Joe Borges, C.E.T.
Ronald William Braun, C.E.T.
D. Gregory Brien, C.E.T.
James Brown, C.E.T.
Paul Carriere, C.E.T.
Romeo Celis Jr., C.E.T.
Robert Chappell, C.E.T.
Allan Cobham, C.E.T.
Serge Cote, C.E.T.
David Courteaux, C.E.T.
Douglas Dally, A.Sc.T.
John De Boer, C.E.T.
John De Jong, C.Tech.
Rolando Dela Cruz, C.E.T.
Andronico Delos Reyes, C.E.T.
Marcel Desmeules, C.E.T.
Louis Dewinter, C.E.T.
Harry Doering, C.E.T.
Hector Duborgel, C.E.T.
Marvin Dupuis, C.E.T.
Ronald Ferguson, C.E.T.
Barry Fletcher, A.Sc.T.
David Ford, C.E.T.
Antonio Francisco, C.Tech.
Giovanni Frisoni, C.E.T.
Sergio Galido, C.E.T.
Christopher Grimaldi, C.E.T.
Collin Hall, C.E.T.
Daniel Hansen, C.E.T.
Brian Harnock, C.E.T.
Bradley Harsell, C.E.T.
Feraydoon Hassan-Shafiee, C.E.T.
David Hudson, C.E.T.
Michael Ignaczewski, C.E.T.
Paul Irwin, C.E.T.
Selvarajah Jebanesan, C.E.T.
Christine Johnston, C.E.T.
Patricia Kennedy, C.E.T.
Art Kreeft, C.E.T.
Edward Kwan, C.E.T.
Blaine Larock, C.E.T.
Richard Lewis, C.E.T.
Pius Liu, C.E.T.
Michael Lovell, C.E.T.
Darryl Lucier, A.Sc.T.
Timothy Machuletz, C.E.T.
Narendra Makwana, C.E.T.
Aldo Marcuzzi, C.E.T.
Philip Mayfield, A.Sc.T.
Kim McEwen, C.E.T.
Kenneth McKinnon, C.E.T.
Carmen Mignelli, C.Tech.
Danny Monteith, C.E.T.
Jamie Monteith, C.Tech.
Michael Morrow, C.E.T.
David Mundy, C.E.T.
Ann Newman, C.E.T.
Anthony O’Brien, C.E.T.
Hans Oehling, C.Tech.
Trevor Owen, C.E.T.
Mark Parker, C.E.T.
Valerie Pearcey, C.Tech.
Alan Perras, C.E.T.
Colin Pilon, C.E.T.
Danny Pozzobon, C.E.T.
Alex Quijalvo, C.E.T.
Stephen Renwick, C.E.T.
William Richardson, C.E.T.
Mark Rolland, C.E.T.
Ronald Rowe, C.E.T.
Ashraf Samuel, C.E.T.
Dev Sandhu, C.E.T.
Domenic Sanzo, C.E.T.
Daniel Schembri, C.E.T.
David Scrace, C.E.T.
Paul Sobiera, C.E.T.
Claudio Spalvieri, C.E.T.
Raymond St. George, C.Tech.
Dezso Szeredi, C.E.T.
Danny Tam, C.E.T.
Phillip Taylor, C.Tech.
John Ticki, C.E.T.
David Tripodi, C.E.T.
Geoffrey Vanderveen, C.E.T.
Bruce Waldron, C.E.T.
David Walker, A.Sc.T.
Donald Zehr, C.E.T.

40-year members

Thomas Avey, C.E.T.
Gervais Clermont, C.E.T.
Bruno Covi, C.E.T.
Haslyne Crandon, C.E.T.
Michael Drewe, C.E.T.
Randolph Edmead, C.E.T.
Gordon Florence, C.E.T.
Marvin Graves, C.E.T.
Murray Hawn, C.E.T.
Walter Jankun, C.E.T.
E. Katsirdakis, C.E.T.
Khalil Khan, C.E.T.
Akbar Lalani, C.E.T.
Robert Leishman, C.E.T.
Stephen McCool, C.E.T.
A. Mikolajewski, C.E.T.
Robert Mortimer, C.E.T.
Robert Pirocchi, C.E.T.
Tomeshwer Prasad, C.E.T., CST
Dennis Price, C.E.T.
John Schmidt, C.E.T.
Joseph Seelall, C.E.T.
Paul Seibel, C.E.T.
Marcelo Villanueva, C.E.T.
Paul Whitehouse, C.E.T.
John Wysman, C.E.T.

50-year members

Robert Bettridge, C.E.T.
Manfred Brudlo, C.E.T.
Floyd Clapp, C.E.T.
Henk De Graauw, C.E.T.
Donald Ferguson, C.E.T.
Brian Hammond, C.E.T.
Donald Holmes, C.E.T.
Theofanis Karagounis, C.E.T.
Benjamin Korec, C.E.T.
George Krakana, C.E.T.
Douglas Kuhn, C.E.T.
R. Madan, C.E.T.
Frank Odorico, C.E.T.
G. Potts, C.E.T.
Gerard Thorpe, C.E.T.
Jeffrey Tristram, C.E.T.
J. Douglas Truman, C.E.T.
Douglas Watt, C.E.T.
Edward Williams, C.E.T.
Colin Wilson, C.E.T.
Gordon Young, C.E.T.

Placing engineering technology professional issues front and centre with our politicians

by Gordon Masters

Members of OACETT’s senior executive team have been engaging in some very constructive conversations of late with government officials regarding issues of high professional priority for our members.

Working with Public Services and Procurement Canada to update Qualified Person status

In October, engineering technology professional association CEOs met in Ottawa with the director general, services and technology acquisition management sector, of Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC). The purpose of the meeting was to inform PSPC of recent changes to the engineering technology profession across Canada and to respectfully suggest that, based on these changes, it is an opportune time for review by the federal government of the Qualified Person (QP) categories for the Task and Solutions Professional Services, specifically in the stream of Technical Engineering and Maintenance Services. The director general agreed and requested that the engineering technology professional associations commence the process by submitting a number of documents for the department’s review. Our interest is to obtain more concrete recognition in the Annex “A” Requirement, for engineering technicians and technologists, which will make it a more efficient process for members to bid on national projects.

With Canada’s infrastructure investment plans to generate new activity across the country, it is expected to boost the sectors, which will support the demand for skilled technical workers such as engineering technicians and technologists. We will keep you posted.

Modernization of air and noise approvals

The Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change (MOECC) granted OACETT stakeholder status in regard to the new proposed Environmental Activity and Sector Registry for air and noise approvals. MOECC held hearings recently to further engage interested stakeholders on this proposal. OACETT is part of an ad hoc committee of individuals who are in discussion with MOECC on expanding the proposed definition of Qualified Persons beyond professional engineers.

OACETT has members qualified in this area of expertise, and denying them access, specifically in regards to regulatory permits required for air and noise emissions in Ontario, is of concern since it will restrict their ability to continue practising. Our committee is putting forward a proposal to expand the scope of Qualified Persons to include other certified professionals with expertise in this field, in addition to professional engineers, such as those who are certified engineering technologists, applied science technologists, certified chemists and scientists.

In particular, our proposal will address the example of recent, very similar, regulatory changes in Saskatchewan where Qps other than professional engineers have been accommodated.

Cap and trade program - Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change

The MOECC requires participants to be registered by November 30, 2016 in order to participate in the March 2017 auction of the Ontario cap and trade program. Companies must open an account in the Compliance Instrument Tracking System Service (CITSS) in order to participate.

If registration by November 30 of this year was not met, a company may choose to prepare and meet the requirements for next year, as follows:

• register by November 30, 2017 (the registration includes submitting the Voluntary Participant Registration Form and completing the CITSS registration);

• submit an emissions report (by June 1, 2017) and a qualified positive or qualified positive verification statement for the 2016 emissions (by September 1, 2017);

• apply for allowances by September 16, 2017 for 2018 vintage allowances based on 2016 product/process parameter/energy use data.

Refer to www.ontario.ca/page/capand- trade-register-and-participatecitss for guidance on how to register.

Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME) - Industrie 2030

CME represents more than 2,500 leading companies nationwide with more than 85 per cent of its members being small and medium-sized enterprises. CME’s membership network accounts for an estimated 82 per cent of total manufacturing production and 90 per cent of Canada’s exports.

OACETT was a sponsor of an October summit held in Ottawa that was organized by CME titled Industrie 2030. Participants attending the summit had a mission in determining, “What would it take to double manufacturing output and value-added exports from Canada by the year 2030?”

They identified a series of business outcomes needed to reach those targets.
Businesses need to be dynamic, profitable, productive, innovative and growing. They must invest in their facilities, processes and products, and they must find new customers in Canada and around the world.

Participants recommended that public and private sector stakeholders focus their efforts on:

• Strengthening the existing and future skilled workforce, including at the management level;

• Increasing rates of adoption of advanced manufacturing technologies;

• Encouraging more new product development and commercialization;

• Improving the business climate for investment; and

• Expanding access to domestic and foreign markets.

To review the initial Industrie 2030 report, visit www.industrie2030.ca/ download.php?id=67.

Gordon Masters is OACETT’s director, government relations: gmasters@oacett.org.

A combined effort to empower student success

Fall has seen a flurry of activity surrounding Carole and George Fletcher Foundation outreach, as momentum continues to grow for bursary funding and disbursement designed to foster excellence in engineering technology education.

In September, George Fletcher, C.E.T., Fellow OACETT, an OACETT past-president and, along with his wife, the namesake of the charitable organization, attended the Niagara College Construction Studies Awards Ceremony. There he provided an update on the “25 for 25 Campaign” established to raise one million dollars to create $40,000 bursaries in all 25 colleges in Ontario offering engineering and applied science programs.

At the $40,000 level, he explained, each endowed fund will sustain the OACETT Technology Award, a $1,000 award presented annually to a deserving student who exemplifies integrity and professionalism. “To date, the Fletcher Foundation, through the generous support of so many who are committed to investing in the next generation of engineering professionals, has raised almost $900,000,” Fletcher reported. “We are thrilled to be so close to meeting our goal and are determined to achieve it.”

Fletcher also announced that the Fletcher Foundation recently provided Niagara College with an additional $10,000, a donation the college matched, bringing their existing bursary to the $40,000 needed to sustain the bursary in perpetuity. “This is great news for those of you studying engineering and applied science technology,” said Fletcher, “and it speaks to the desire of your college and your future colleagues to see you succeed in your studies and embark on a rewarding career.”

Fletcher cited this milestone as an example of what can be achieved when like-minded organizations come together to promote careers in engineering technology and ease the path from academic to career success.

Another example can be found in the Toronto Region. The region’s three chapters jointly hosted a well-attended Technology Tee-Off Golf Tournament on August 27 and donated the proceeds, an event record of $1539.80, to the Fletcher Foundation, demonstrating once again how committed OACETT’s chapters are to helping upcoming generations realize their professional dreams.

Proof positive that this commitment pays off can be found in Foundation beneficiaries like Ceasar Jamil Basilio. An architectural technology student at St. Clair College, Basilio is this year’s recipient of the Fletcher Generation Award. The award is presented annually to a deserving child or grandchild of an OACETT member enrolled in a post-secondary engineering technology or applied science program.

In offering his thanks for the award, Basilio noted, “I’ve never felt so thrilled as when I received the text from my dad [Rolly Basilio, C.E.T.] that I was this year’s winner,” adding, “It will help me a lot with my schooling.”

Donations really do make a difference, and all the effort that goes into raising funds for the Fletcher Foundation have far-reaching impact. Thanks to all of those who have lent their support and contributed to the Foundation’s ongoing efforts to promote the engineering technology profession and empower students to pursue their chosen career.

To make a donation, please visit www.oacett25for25.com/donate.html.

Members on the move

Samiddha Aryasinghe, C.E.T., was recently licensed as a Professional Engineer (P.Eng.) and has been hired by the University of Ottawa as a senior project manager in the project management department. In this role, he is leading delivery of major capital projects on time and within budget while meeting defined project objectives and maintaining client satisfaction. Previously, Aryasinghe worked at the University of Toronto as a senior project manager for eight years.

Kyle Avery, C.Tech., was recently promoted to lead contract administration technician at David Schaeffer Engineering Limited (DSEL). Avery joined DSEL in 2013 as a technician and handled as-built submissions, earthwork quantity checks and the review of lot grading certifications for many of DSEL’s land development projects. Avery was involved in the hiring process for two technicians, and has been responsible for their direct supervision and professional growth.

Adam MacDonald, C. Tech., has started a new job as a structural technician with the Ministry of Transportation. His responsibilities include conducting specialized structural inspections and reviewing standards, specifications, manuals, guidelines and policies related to the construction, inspection and rehabilitation of structural steel bridges. MacDonald has more than 11 years of experience working in quality assurance and quality control, primarily in the nuclear and oil and gas field.

Jake McKillop, C. Tech., has recently joined the Township of Southwold as a public works superintendent. In this role, he manages, supervises, co-ordinates and directs all activities of the public works department. He is also responsible for the procurement of equipment, supplies and services, as well as assisting in the development of the annual department capital and operating budgets. Previously, McKillop worked at the Town of Tilsonburg as an operations technologist for four years.

Tim Paquin, C.E.T., has recently joined BBE Consulting Canada as senior ventilation consultant. Paquin brings more than 25 years of underground mine ventilation experience to the BBE Group of companies, and prior to joining BBE he worked for several of Canada’s largest mining consultancies. Presently, he is also a member of Technology Accreditation Canada and Canadian Technology Accreditation Criteria – Program General Learning Outcomes committees.

Jordan Wright, C.E.T., has recently joined the Corporation of the City of Kingston as an environmental technologist. Wright oversees and assists with the environmental components of a wide variety of municipal projects within the city. Previously, he was employed with Malroz Engineering Inc. as an environmental technologist for five years in the environmental consulting industry.

WHAT’S NEW?

We want to hear from other members who have recently changed jobs, received a promotion or an award, or completed an educational program. Make sure your fellow OACETT members read about it in The Ontario Technologist.

Promote your success – send in your submissions to the editor at editor@oacett.org.

The 3- and 6-Year Certification Rule

Producing lasting value for members and OACETT

by George Scott

In 2005, the Institute of Engineering Technology of Ontario (IETO) charted a new course with its commitment to make OACETT an association of certified members. Soon after, they adopted a policy known as the 3- and 6-Year Certification Rule to pave a fair path to certification for all associate members.

A hard target with flexible fulfillment “We want to be known for our certification; that’s what sets us apart in the eyes of governments, employers, clients and the public,” explained Barbara Chappell, OACETT registrar and director of IETO. “There’s tremendous value in our designations because they represent professional standards and the work members undertake to achieve them. And because our engineering technicians and technologists meet these high standards, they can rightfully have pride in their profession.”

Certification has a significant monetary value as well. On average, certified technicians and technologists achieve a 20-30 per cent annual salary premium over their non-certified colleagues at the same career stage. For details, be sure to read the Salary Survey article, starting on page 20.

Certification has made a notable difference in the career of Jeffrey Riedl, C.E.T., an engineering inspector for the City of Kitchener. “I had to have it completed within one year of getting this position. And, in addition to an increased wage,” Riedl said, “it opens up promotional opportunities I wouldn’t be able to get otherwise.”

At a time when 40 per cent of its membership was in the Associate category, OACETT’s leadership recognized that the goal of having 100 per cent of its members certified was a lofty one. It was going to take time. “That’s why the 3- and 6-Year Certification Rule was enacted with an accommodative approach,” Chappell continued. “We believe in the Associate member category as the introduction to membership, allowing applicants to become members while completing the requirements for certification. And so we wanted to offer plenty of freedom and flexibility to help them get where they need to go.”

Cole Natalin, C.E.T., supervisor, energy contracts at the City of Windsor, agrees. “I believe OACETT’s 3- and 6-year rule offers members ample time. But for me, as soon as I was eligible, I moved ahead with certification. It wasn’t so much a push from the Association,” he added, “but more of a personal goal.”

The time is right

OACETT’s membership has embraced the commitment to certification. Since the policy was enacted, the composition of the membership has risen to 71 per cent certified, under a voluntary framework. With the introduction of mandatory Continuing Professional Development earlier this year, the IETO Board concluded that the time was right to push the rest of the way and make compliance mandatory for associates who became members after July 1, 2005 to certify. This decision was recently ratified by Council.

Affected associate members have received a customized summary by mail of their certification status, outlining the components they may be missing and providing an explanation of what they need to do to meet their personal mandatory certification date. For members subject to the 3-Year rule, the first enforcement will be January 2019. Those not in compliance by that date will be given a grace period of six months, after which they would be removed from OACETT membership.

For associate members who still have further academics to complete, they have been awarded six years to achieve certification. Those who were notified of their academic requirements prior to December 31, 2013 will need to show some progression toward certification by January 1, 2019 – in the form of at least one course or the PPE/IEPPE. Progress will earn them a deferment to January 1, 2022. If they joined OACETT between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2015, they are automatically extended to January 1, 2022 before their membership would be suspended.

Reducing barriers

Chappell added: “As an example of our flexible approach to certification, this year we introduced the IEPPE for internationally educated applicants. We knew they had the skills to qualify but a lack of Canadian work experience was proving to be a barrier for many. We also intend to update our citizenship and residency requirements in the months ahead to remove another barrier to certification.”

Associate members affected either by the 3- or 6-Year Certification Rule will view these timelines as generous. But that does not mean you should postpone the work indefinitely. Members should take the courses they may be missing, in person or online, through their local community college or through an OACETT technical exam. Study the law and ethics examination materials and write the PPE/IEPPE at their earliest opportunity. Send in the details of your work experience. Take an English language equivalency course if you need it. Begin work on your technology report if the C.E.T. is your goal. And track your application toward certification through the OACETT website.

“In adjudicating progress, we realize that there may be extenuating circumstances, such as unemployment, illness, disability or a workers’ compensation claim, that could get in the way of your progress,” Chappell concluded. “As the registrar, I have some latitude to grant an extension. But mandatory certification is now our policy and we hope every associate member treats this goal as his or her own personal career objective.”

For inquiries regarding your certification requirements or the 3- and 6-Year Certification Rule, contact Camilla Poliah at cpoliah@oacett.org.

George Scott is president at GSTS Consulting Services.

Telling your engineering technology story

by Erica Lee Garcia, P.Eng.

National Engineering Month (NEM) 2017 is coming soon and, in Ontario, OACETT members and engineering technology students are getting ready for the celebration taking place in March. Whether it’s in a community centre, mall, science fair, local youth group or in a classroom or on campus, the goal of every NEM event is the same: to inform the general public about the value that engineering technology brings to society and to inspire the next generation of engineering technologists and technicians!

Part of our strategy is to utilize tools of storytelling (which is an art, not a science) in order to spark the imaginations of young people. When we shine a light on our own values, motivations and identities as engineering technology professionals, we make a very important human connection that can turn a good outreach activity into an incredible one. We know from the experience of previous outreach events that a good event, done right, has the potential to impact a child, teen or young adult deeply and possibly even open the door to a lifelong love of engineering and technology.

Since NEM is a few months away, there is time to practice your engineering technology storytelling! And, here are some ideas to get your started:

• Think of a moment from your past when you knew you were meant to be an engineering technician or technologist. What happened?

• Was there a time when you (or your team) accomplished something that you were especially proud of? What happened?

• Think about an engineering technology success that made a difference to people, to their quality of life or safety, health and happiness.

• Think of one of your biggest successes in your career so far. What did that success mean to you? How did it feel? How did it impact the way you saw yourself and/ or the world around you?

• What would you like to accomplish before the end of your career? What ‘big problem’ are you passionate about solving?

These ideas are adapted from the Storytelling Canvas, produced by the Engineering Change Lab, January 2016. With the help of these questions, you can start some fantastic conversations. While you may take for granted your own experience and perspectives as an engineering technician or technologist, your stories will be very interesting and novel to those who don’t work in the field. When you take the time to craft a story in a way that will by Erica Lee Garcia, P.Eng. be relatable, inspiring and not intimidating to them, you open hearts and minds and help them see the world in a way they never had before – and there is no better time than NEM to do it.

OACETT and our partners Engineers Without Borders, Ontario Society of Professional Engineers and Professional Engineers Ontario oversee, co-ordinate, administer and manage the sponsorship of the NEM campaign in Ontario every year. Since 1992, March has been designated the month of engineering in Canada, celebrating engineering excellence across the country. In 2016, NEM Ontario co-ordinated 305 events province- wide, reaching an estimated 35,000 participants across the province. It’s Canada’s biggest celebration of engineering and engineering technology! To further add to the excitement, college students can compete in the College Challenge for a cash prize.

Want to get involved in National Engineering Month in March? Watch #NEM2017 and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram for all the fun! Share your story. Connect with your community. Contact your local OACETT chapter to volunteer at the events they have planned in March. Check out http://nemontario.ca for more details.

Erica Lee Garcia, P.Eng. is Engineers of Tomorrow venture lead at Engineers Without Borders Canada

Busy days for Technology Accreditation Canada

As the new school semester is now in full swing, these are busy days for Technology Accreditation Canada (TAC).

Accreditations

In August, TAC granted accreditations to five programs at the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology, the first in Alberta. National program accreditation certificates were presented to representatives of the Chemical Engineering Technology, Chemical Laboratory Technology, Electrical Engineering Technology, Instrumentation Engineering Technology and Geomatics Engineering Technology programs on October 26. Two additional accreditations are moving forward with site visits, one in British Columbia, the other in Ontario, and several other accreditations are expected to commence in late fall.

NAP logo

An engineering technology or applied science program accredited by TAC gives students an assurance that the program’s curriculum meets the high standards of the profession. To help students identify which programs are accredited, TAC has developed a bilingual National Accredited Program logo. The logo is now available to colleges on its website and in promotional materials.

National standards

The recent publication of the Program General Learning Outcome for Technologists was the first step in revising the Canadian Technology Accreditation Criteria (CTAC), which is used in the audit of engineering technology and applied science programs for the purposes of accreditation. Within the next month, a Standards Development Committee will be struck to examine a number of broader issues, prior to the review of the remaining 36 CTAC.

Value added service

In addition to offering accreditation services, TAC will soon be making available resource materials based on industry best practices to colleges to support the development of curriculum. The first such material will be technology report guidelines and examples of exceptional technology reports. Stay tuned for additional resources to be posted to the TAC website.

Grant-funded training assists development of enhanced curriculum at Mohawk College

by Sean Nix, M.Eng., RPP

On April 12-14, 2016, I had the privilege of attending a threeday intensive training session hosted by Transport Simulation Systems (TSS) on its microsimulation software package: Aimsun. My attendance was largely thanks to an OACETT Teaching and Technology Transfer Grant that I was awarded earlier this year.

Microsimulation is being widely used as a tool for advanced traffic engineering analysis on scenarios that more common static traffic analysis tools cannot model. With time-intensive coding and scenario testing, microsimulaton packages such as Aimsun can more effectively model complex traffic engineering scenarios. One scenario that continues to emerge due to transportation infrastructure investment across Ontario includes the operation of surface rapid transit systems in the median of an existing arterial road with less predictable traffic signal operation – a scenario that is being modelled in microsimulation packages more and more.

Prior to this training, I did not have any hands-on experience with microsimulation. While three days was certainly not enough to become an expert on the use of Aimsun, it provided me with a foundation of skills in microsimulation packages to eventually offer assistance to postsecondary students who are using it for the first time.

The Transportation Engineering Technology advanced diploma program at Mohawk College is a unique three-year program in Canada that provides students with extensive specialized training in traffic studies, transportation planning and traffic engineering. This training includes both field-based studies and in-lab analysis using the most up-to-date transportation engineering analysis software. Graduates from the program are eligible for membership and certification with OACETT.

As transportation engineering professionals are now heavily reliant on microsimulation to carry out advanced transportation capacity analysis, it is recognized that Mohawk College is currently lacking in this regard compared to some of the Ontario universities that have limited site licenses for such software packages. Incorporating microsimulation training into the Mohawk College curriculum would make graduates from the program more attractive to employers who seek candidates experienced in microsimulation, as these candidates would not need to be provided with employerfunded training after being hired.

Now that I have had some handson experience with Aimsun, it is my hope to use my level of understanding to establish and teach the first course in an Ontario college that focusses almost entirely on the use of microsimulation for transportation modelling. I am currently in discussion with senior administration at the college on obtaining site licenses for a microsimulation package for one of our labs, and am negotiating quotes with software vendors to ensure the best value for the college. If all goes according to plan, this course would be offered for the first time in Fall 2017 for sixth semester students.

My sincerest thanks to OACETT for awarding me the Teaching and Technology Transfer Grant. This investment in Ontario colleges will help to enhance career opportunities for prospective OACETT members who graduate from Mohawk college based on their future skills in microsimulation.

Sean Nix is a professor and program co-ordinator in the Transportation Engineering Technology advanced diploma program at Mohawk College in Hamilton.

Calendar of Events

February 1-3, 2017

Human Resources Professionals Association Annual Conference& Trade Show Metro Toronto Convention Centre www.hrpa.ca/conf2016

February 7-9

Economic Developers Council of Ontario Conference and Tradeshow Toronto Marriott Downtown Eaton Centre www.edcoconference.com

February 26 – March 1

Rural Ontario Municipal Association and Ontario Good Roads Association Combined Conference Fairmont Royal York Hotel, Toronto www.ograconference.ca

March 1-2

International Conference on Water Management Modeling Marriott Courtyard Toronto, Brampton www.chiwater.com

June 1-3

OACETT AGM and Conference The Westin Trillium House, Blue Mountain Town of the Blue Mountains www.oacett.org

A welcome voice for students

by Emily Sinkins

In a profession that offers such varied opportunities, OACETT can take a leading role in helping college students arrive at the right career choice, according to OACETT’s new student representative on Council, Chantal Goertz.

“I think the hardest thing for students once they graduate is finding out what kind of job they want,” says Goertz, a second-year civil engineering technician student at Niagara College who was sworn into her Council position at the September meeting. “Hosting a small workshop that shows the different career paths that the diploma could get them on would be a great way for OACETT to assist students in the transition, as well as a way to promote becoming a member.”

For her own part, Goertz credits her father for piquing her interest in engineering technology. “When I was 12 years old, he took me to an event at the University of Waterloo for Go ENG Girl, which was trying to get females into the engineering field,” she recalls. “After that, I took tech classes all throughout high school and began using AutoCAD at 14.”

While she hopes to pursue a career in design, as a draftsperson or AutoCAD technician perhaps, she expects her involvement on Council will expose her to a range of professional possibilities. “I hope to gain some knowledge of what goes on outside of school and the different potential opportunities that are available after I graduate,” she says.

She also has plenty to contribute, particularly with respect to raising awareness among college students about the value of certification and belonging to one’s professional association. “Most students are unaware of how important it is to join at a young age and don’t find out until they’ve graduated,” says Goertz. “I hope I’m able to share with other college students what OACETT has to offer and why it’s a great organization to become a part of.”

Goertz believes social media is an essential tool for spreading this message and that OACETT could do more to connect with a younger audience by delivering content online that’s especially relevant to them. “Basically every student has a cellphone, laptop or some way to access the internet or social media, so why not take that as an advantage?” she asks.

With a passion for her future profession and a flair for communication – she writes in her spare time – Goertz is well positioned to connect with the next generation of engineering technicians and technologists. She put this talent to good use recently as a mentor at a Skills Ontario Career Exploration Conference, where she spoke to high school students about women in skilled trades and technology.

Serving as a voice for those on the cusp of joining the engineering technology fold as student representative is a challenge Goertz is ably equipped for and, she says, eager to take on. “Having this experience at my age and being able to say I was a part of OACETT Council is an amazing step forward.”

Emily Sinkins is editor of The Ontario Technologist.

New OACETT member appointed to PEO Council

by Michelle Malcolm-Francis

Every three years, the lieutenant governor of Ontario appoints an outstanding member of OACETT to join the Professional Engineers Ontario (PEO) Council to represent the public interest and to bring the experience and perspective of engineering technology professionals to conversations that impact the engineering industry. This year lieutenant- governor Elizabeth Dowdeswell selected Nadine Rush, C.E.T., to continue OACETT’s legacy of effective exchange, collaboration and innovation with PEO.

Rush, the current OACETT Georgian Bay Chapter chair and former Abstract Peer Review Committee member for the 2016 AGM and Conference’s Technical Program, was thrilled to get the news from the lieutenant- governor and began the important work of bringing the voice of OACETT members to the discussion table at her first PEO Council meeting on September 22 and 23.

“My first meeting went well and the Council members were very welcoming. I became acquainted with PEO policies and procedures and was made aware of a public campaign to promote engineering that indirectly increases awareness of the technology field,” said Rush.

As OACETT’s new PEO councillor, Rush will aim to carry forward a tradition of the two associations working together to maintain standards, protect the public and advance the profession of engineering and engineering technology.

Similar to her predecessor Sharon Reid, C.Tech., she will provide insight from an OACETT perspective into various issues and topics being discussed by Council, for example, the public campaign, the passing of bylaws and motions, the forming of committees and tasks forces and the approving of operating and capital budgets for the organization.

In this role, Rush will consider public interest before voting on a policy or regulation. And, as a PEO councillor, she will engage in conversations that influence the perception, work and recognition of OACETT members and, with Council, will provide the overall direction of the association.

“Serving on PEO Council is an experience I value in so many ways. Over the next three years, I hope to strengthen my leadership skills by interacting with various people in the engineering field, become more informed about industry issues and use some of these skills learned to help the chapter level of OACETT in dealing with matters related to PEO,” said Rush.

“I see this experience as a great opportunity to work with another great organization and to contribute to the association’s future success,” she added.

Rush also looks forward to networking and forging relationships with a team of professionals who, collectively, have a lot of experience in various areas of engineering and together are working towards the shared goal of strengthening the profession.

Rush has more than 20 years of experience in the engineering field working for her father’s company, also an engineering consulting firm and now the City of Barrie as a development services technologist. She is a graduate of Georgian College’s Environmental Engineering Technology program and makes it a practice to keep up to date with new and upcoming technologies.

Rush is counting on everything she’s learned throughout her career and the knowledge she’s gained as an OACETT volunteer to help her hurdle the first few months in this new role. She’s optimistic that once she’s familiar with the processes and procedures, she’ll bring fresh, thoughtful ideas and perspective to Council deliberations, positively contributing to PEO meetings and helping OACETT share their values and interests.

Michelle Malcolm-Franics is OACETT’s marketing and communications specialist.

Read the full article at http://www.bluetoad.com/article/OACETT+In+Action/2649469/362425/article.html.

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