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Haverford Fall 2016 : Page 26

mixed media B ooks Q&A: R.W. Alley ’79 R.W. (Bob) Alley ’79 was fresh out of Haverford when he launched his career as a children’s book author and illustrator. Perhaps best known as the illustrator of the venerable Paddington Bear series, today he has well over 100 books to his credit— and he’s still going strong. In October, Clarion Books released the third and fourth installments of a series Alley wrote and illustrated about the playtime adventures of four imaginative siblings. To learn more about his latest work and his long career, we asked another star in the children’s book firmament, Nick Bruel ’87 , creator of the popular Bad Kitty series, to interview Alley, who lives in Barrington, R.I., with his wife, Zoë. It turns out that Alley and Bruel had long been fans of each other’s work but had no idea about their alumni connection until Haverford magazine put them in touch. Nick Bruel: Let’s talk about what you’re doing now, this series of picture books that you’ve written as well as illustrated. R.W. Alley: Clark in the Deep South Pole and Mitchell on the Moon came out in October. NB: They’re really lovely. What I find fascinating is that it’s the same group of children in each book but—almost as if this was a television series— each character gets his, or her, own episode. RWA: The idea was to write illustrated in quite a while— since 1990. What brought the urge to write again? RWA: When you’re doing a record. Nobody was going to hire me to illustrate someone else’s words, because I wasn’t a very polished illustrator. I knew the way to get into it was to write my own books. So I wrote The Ghost in Dobbs Diner , and then another one after that. But I wanted to get married, so I needed a real job. Hallmark hired me and we spent two years in Kansas City. Then I was hired on at a small card company in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, and after a couple of years an agent approached me and said she had a lot of textbook work for an illustrator. So I quit my job and here we are. NB: The first Paddington Bear book came out in 1958, and you took over the series in the mid-1990s. How did the opportunity to be the illustrator for Paddington come about? RWA: I’d done a couple Harper Sea and Gretchen Over the Beach came out together in the spring, and Annabelle at the something that would recreate those childhood moments when you’re not included with the others. You have to go off and figure out a way to amuse yourself on your own. It’s what I remember doing myself. It’s what I remember my children doing—taking random stuff that they came across and making a world out of it. NB: These are the first books that you’ve both written and series like Paddington that you can count on getting royalties from for a little bit, you can then think about branching out and doing some other stuff. I had been illustrating other people’s words for long enough. I thought it was important to think of my own words. So I’m trying to write more. NB: How did your first book, The Ghost in Dobbs Diner , published in 1981, come about? RWA: When I graduated from Haverford, I knew I wanted to do picture books. I’d figured that out some time in my senior year. But I had no track books and Harper & Row merged with William Collins over in the U.K. Collins had the rights to Paddington and the folks in New York decided, “We should mine the Paddington brand and commission Michael Bond to write some new picture books for the U.S. market and we’ll get a U.S. illustrator to do it.” I had to audition. I had to draw up the character and go over continued on page 32 26 Haverford Magazine

Mixed Media

Books

Q&A: R.W. Alley ’79

R. W. (Bob) Alley ’79 was fresh out of Haverford when he launched his career as a children’s book author and illustrator. Perhaps best known as the illustrator of the venerable Paddington Bear series, today he has well over 100 books to his credit— and he’s still going strong. In October, Clarion Books released the third and fourth installments of a series Alley wrote and illustrated about the playtime adventures of four imaginative siblings. To learn more about his latest work and his long career, we asked another star in the children’s book firmament, Nick Bruel ’87, creator of the popular Bad Kitty series, to interview Alley, who lives in Barrington, R.I., with his wife, Zoë. It turns out that Alley and Bruel had long been fans of each other’s work but had no idea about their alumni connection until Haverford magazine put them in touch.

Nick Bruel: Let’s talk about what you’re doing now, this series of picture books that you’ve written as well as illustrated.

R. W. Alley: Clark in the Deep Sea and Gretchen Over the Beach came out together in the spring, and Annabelle at the South Pole and Mitchell on the Moon came out in October.

NB: They’re really lovely. What I find fascinating is that it’s the same group of children in each book but—almost as if this was a television series— each character gets his, or her, own episode.

RWA: The idea was to write something that would recreate those childhood moments when you’re not included with the others. You have to go off and figure out a way to amuse yourself on your own. It’s what I remember doing myself. It’s what I remember my children doing—taking random stuff that they came across and making a world out of it.

NB: These are the first books that you’ve both written and illustrated in quite a while— since 1990. What brought the urge to write again?

RWA: When you’re doing a series like Paddington that you can count on getting royalties from for a little bit, you can then think about branching out and doing some other stuff. I had been illustrating other people’s words for long enough. I thought it was important to think of my own words. So I’m trying to write more.

NB: How did your first book, The Ghost in Dobbs Diner, published in 1981, come about?

RWA: When I graduated from Haverford, I knew I wanted to do picture books. I’d figured that out some time in my senior year. But I had no track record. Nobody was going to hire me to illustrate someone else’s words, because I wasn’t a very polished illustrator. I knew the way to get into it was to write my own books. So I wrote The Ghost in Dobbs Diner, and then another one after that. But I wanted to get married, so I needed a real job. Hallmark hired me and we spent two years in Kansas City. Then I was hired on at a small card company in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, and after a couple of years an agent approached me and said she had a lot of textbook work for an illustrator. So I quit my job and here we are.

NB: The first Paddington Bear book came out in 1958, and you took over the series in the mid-1990s. How did the opportunity to be the illustrator for Paddington come about?

RWA: I’d done a couple Harper books and Harper & Row merged with William Collins over in the U.K. Collins had the rights to Paddington and the folks in New York decided, “We should mine the Paddington brand and commission Michael Bond to write some new picture books for the U.S. market and we’ll get a U.S. illustrator to do it.” I had to audition. I had to draw up the character and go over to England with the editor and present my drawings to Michael. He’s a very nice guy. He took us around London, showed us all the Paddington sites, and we hit it off.

After the first meeting, I spent the night in the hotel room doing some new drawings, because I could tell from Michael’s face that something wasn’t exactly right with some of the characters. I fiddled around and got them closer to what he had in mind. And that was how it began. The U. K. division was going to find an English illustrator to do the books over there, but Michael persuaded them to have me be the sole illustrator for Paddington. That’s how it’s been ever since.

NB: I’m curious about the collaboration with your wife [Zoë B. Alley] on There’s a Wolf at the Door and There’s a Princess in the Palace, which are done in a large, comic-book format. It’s unusual for the illustrator to actually collaborate with the author during the process of making the book. Tell us about that.

RWA: Those are two of the happiest experiences I’ve had working on picture books. I think because I got to see her write them, I felt like I really knew the characters. Also, I loved the comic-book format. I think that’s a really underutilized form in picture books.

Before I even began drawing, Zoë wrote everything out. I added the visual elements to exaggerate the characters and capture them as best I could. There was a little bit of back and forth, but we’ve been married long enough that she knew that I would fill in the blanks between the bits of dialogue. The only question she asked was if something was illustratable or not. I basically said, “Everything is illustratable. The words are the most important thing.”

NB: Looking at your illustrations, it looks like they’re line art and watercolor with maybe some acrylic mixed in. Am I right?

RWA: You’re exactly right. It’s a crow quill pen and ink, and the watercolor, and colored pencil, and sometimes crayons—just whatever looks good.

NB: Do you ever do digital illustrations?

RWA: My son, Max, who does animation work, tried to help me with that. I actually did a [digital] sample for a black-and-white chapter book because I thought, “Well, this could be kind of fun.” But the publisher said, “This is nice, but we miss the scratchy pen line and the feeling of actual paint on paper.”

NB: Did you get any formal art training at Haverford?

RWA: Fritz Janschka was the guy who taught me. I goosed up my GPA very nicely by enrolling in a class with Fritz every semester. He would just teach me whatever I was interested in learning. He was a fabulous watercolorist, a wonderful line artist. That’s really where I learned.

NB: I only took one course with him, and I thought he was marvelous. He was a Bryn Mawr professor, right?

RWA: Yes. He just passed away this year. He was 97. But other than those classes, I didn’t do much studio art. My parents wouldn’t let me major in fine arts at a school like Haverford. I had to do art history, an academic subject.

NB: Because art history is so much more practical, right?

RWA: I know, yeah.

NB: What’s next for you?

RWA: There’s a new Paddington novel. There’s also Paddington being redone in all sorts of formats, and I’m doing new covers for those books. Zoë and I are also acting as editorial consultants, and me as the artist, for a new series of picture books about a dog called Enzo. It’s based on the narrator of the Garth Stein novel The Art of Racing in the Rain, which was, and still is, very popular. Three have been published, and I’m going to be working on the fourth over the winter. Then, after that, I don’t know. How about you?

NB: Once I finish the Bad Kitty book I’m working on, I’m going to be writing my first middle-grade novel.

RWA: I love your books. I’m really curious to see what you do with middle-grade fiction. That’s going to be fun. More information: www.rwalley.com Nick Bruel ’87, whose first book, Boing, was a New York Times bestseller, is the author and illustrator of more than 20 Bad Kitty books, including Bad Kitty Does Not Like Video Games, and Bad Kitty Does Not Like Snow. The series has sold more than 8.5 million copies. Bruel lives in Tarrytown, N.Y., with his wife and daughter and their cat Esmeralda.

The idea was to write something that would recreate those childhood moments when you’re not included with the others.You have to go off and figure out a way to amuse yourself on your own.

“You never need a fortune to eat like royalty”

In her book Meet Me at the Bamboo Table: Everyday Meals Everywhere (Chin Music Press), Anita Verna Crofts ’92 offers a collection of 21 vividly crafted essays accompanied by sumptuous photographs that capture meals and memories in 15 countries. Crofts, who teaches at the University of Washington, is a longtime blogger about food and identity at pepperforthebeast.Com, and has been published in Gastronomica, Saveur, Arcade, and the four-volume Food Cultures of the World Encyclopedia. The first chapter of Meet Me at the Bamboo Table traces the beginnings of her passion for food and her interest in the ways that meals “mark our lives” back to her Haverford days, when she spent a semester in Nanjing, China. There, driven by the daily burning question “Where should we eat?” she and her new classmates explored the small eateries in their university neighborhood and beyond.

One early find was a noodle stand shoehorned into an alley near the campus gates. Square wood stools surrounded tables so small that they looked on loan from a nursery school. Cauldrons of hot water kept skeins of noodles boiling and acted as a heat source for hungry customers and cooks alike. Noodles were served swimming in a hearty broth with diced scallions, wilted greens, and a handful of shredded pickled vegetables strewed atop. The final preparation involved the cook cracking an egg straight into the bowl, where it poached on contact. Saucers of self-service chili pepper oil were on each table. This was the kind of heat I was seeking. I curled like a question mark over my large bowl of noodles. Each bite warmed me. …

Curiosity rewards the newcomer. As I grew bolder exploring the city, I discovered roasted sweet potato vendors at makeshift charcoal ovens converted from oil drums. They offered hot handheld meals for pennies. I fished out a few bills the size of Monopoly money and walked away with a blackened and blistered ka?o hóngshu? That could feed three. It rested on two torn squares of yesterday’s newspaper. The warmth flooded my hands and hit my face as I squeezed the sweet potato apart to expose the deep orange-yellow flesh. In a season and a society with a bruise-colored palette, this splash of color dazzled. Chinese fashion still competed with boxy Mao suits of dark olive, battleship gray, or blue. Dull concrete apartment buildings were the same color as the frosty sky. Pelotons of black bikes spun their wheels in formation along major thoroughfares. The most colorful thing in Nanjing was the food.

More Alumni Titles

STEPHON ALEXANDER ’93:

The Jazz of Physics: The Secret Link Between Music and the Structure of the Universe (Basic Books). “Part memoir, part history of science, part physics popularization, and part jazz lesson” is how The New York Times described this wide-ranging book by former Haverford physics professor Alexander. According to the Times, his exploration “ventures far out onto the cutting edge of modern cosmology, presenting a compelling case for vibration and resonance being at the heart of the physical structure we find around us, from the smallest particle of matter to the largest clusters of galaxies.”

NICHOLSON BAKER ’79:

Substitute: Going to School With a Thousand Kids (Blue Rider Press). Baker (Vox, The Fermata, The Anthologist, Human Smoke) was planning to write a long book about educational theory when he realized that a little experience on the ground might be in order. The result is a detailed account of the 28 days Baker spent as a K-12 substitute teacher in a school district in his home state of Maine. A New York Times review said about the book, “There are few substitutes for Substitute. Excepting those accounts that point to larger social injustices, Baker’s book may be the most revealing depiction of the contemporary American classroom that we have to date.”

STEPHANIE BUECHLER ’89 and Anne-Marie Hanson, editors: A Political Ecology of Women, Water and Global Environmental Change (Routledge). This volume brings together political ecologists and feminist scholars from multiple disciplines to explore how a feminist political-ecology framework can offer fresh insights in the study of rural and urban livelihoods dependent on vulnerable waterways, wetlands, and coastal environments, and develops solution-oriented advances to theory, policy, and planning to address global environmental changes.

MITA CHOUDHURY ’85: The Wanton Jesuit and the Wayward Saint: A Tale of Sex, Religion, and Politics in Eighteenth-Century France (Penn State Press). Choudhury, a professor at Vassar College, investigates the famous 1731 trial in which a young woman in the south of France accused her Jesuit confessor of seduction, heresy, abortion, and bewitchment. Generally considered to be the last witchcraft trial in early modern France, the affair was central to the volatile politics of an era in which clerical power was being reined in. [For more about Choudhury, see “Roads Taken,” p. 50.]

LAURO HALSTEAD ’57: An Unexpected Journey: A Physician’s Life in the Shadow of Polio (CreateSpace). The summer after his first year at Haverford, Halstead was stricken by polio while traveling in Spain. His new memoir describes his journey from the breathing machine that saved him to an adventurous life and a pioneering career in medicine (despite a paralyzed right arm) whose achievements included helping spinal-cord-injured men have biological children and identifying a late phase of polio known as post-polio syndrome. Halstead retired in 2012 after 50 years in medicine, 26 of them at MedStar Health National Rehabilitation Hospital in Washington, D.C.

MIKE HARVEY ’60: Nibble Viewpoints: Business Insights From the Computing Revolution (A.P.P.L.E.). This book features a collection of business models written by Harvey over the 12 years he published Nibble, which started out as a newsletter for Apple II users and evolved into a monthly magazine. Also included are more than 60 editorials from Nibble offering historic news, predictions, and analysis from the dawn of the personal computing era.

ELINOR GRAY (HICKEY) ’12: Compound a Felony: A Queer Affair of Sherlock Holmes (Full Fathom Five) A longtime writer of fan fiction, Hickey, writing as Elinor Gray, devotes her first published novel to reimagining the relationship between Sherlock Holmes and his intimate friend Dr. Watson in an erotic vein. More of Hickey’s Holmes and Watson tales can be found at her website, mistyzeo.net.

JORDAN LANDES ’94: London Quakers in the Trans- Atlantic World: The Creation of an Early Modern Community (Palgrave). In the first 50 years of the Society of Friends, the group expanded its trans-Atlantic presence through the creation and use of networks, including intellectual and theological exchange, and through traveling ministries and trade. This book focuses on the crucial role played by the London Yearly Meeting and London Friends in that expansion of Quaker activity. Landes is the research collections librarian for history at the Senate House Library, University of London.

NOAH SAMUEL LEAVITT ’91 and Helen Kiyong Kim: JewAsian: Race, Religion, and Identity for America’s Newest Jews (University of Nebraska Press). Leavitt, an associate dean of students at Whitman College, and his sociologist wife and co-author examine the intersection of race, religion, and ethnicity in the increasing number of households that are both Jewish American and Asian American. Based on in-depth interviews with families, the authors’ research sheds light on the everyday lives of these partnerships and how their children negotiate their own identities in the 21st century.

ANYA KRUGOVOY SILVER ’91: From Nothing (Louisiana State University Press). In her third collection of poems, Silver, author of The Ninety-Third Name of God and I Watched You Disappear, grounds her work in the traditions of meditative and contemplative poetry, addressing questions about how to make meaning out of suffering, and offering glimpses of the divine in seemingly mundane moments. Silver, who wrote an essay for this magazine (winter 2011) about the cancer diagnosis that has shaped her vocation as a poet, is a professor of English at Mercer University.

SCOTT G. SIPPLE ’72 (writing as S.T. Stone): Stepping Out: A New Believer’s Guide (WestBow Press). Sipple, according to a review in Kirkus Reviews, “shares the results of his personal study of the Bible, digging into Scripture and frequently drawing homespun biblical applications from his own life in order to clarify some truths about faith.” The author’s self-deprecating and humorous reflections, observes Kirkus, take the form of a spiritual autobiography, which is “the book’s greatest strength for both newcomers and lifelong Christians.”

MARC ZEGANS ’83: Boys in the Woods (Crane Maiden Books). This limited, numbered, handmade edition by Pennsylvaniabased bookmaker Vers Libris Studios features a collection of Zegans’ latest poems, which explore the darker, grittier aspects of the lives of boys growing up amidst the woods and waters of New England.

Music

When Jessica Turnoff Ferrari ’95 is leading a Florida congregation in the age-old rituals of Jewish prayer, it might surprise everyone that her roots as a cantor lie in both the example of her mother’s own cantorial career and her time at Haverford with the semi-legendary campus band Hiram.

A collective that cranked out R&B, soul, jazz, and funk in the vein of Stevie Wonder and Aretha Franklin, the band’s full name (which varied over the years) was The Hiram L. Weinstein All-Star Memorial Funk Contingent with the Re-evolutionary Horn Junta featuring the Subterranean Pan-Galactic Conspiratory Rhythm Movement, and it was Ferrari’s prime musical outlet during her college years. “If Hiram were a class,” she says, “it would have been the most useful preparation for my career.”

That career is a multifaceted ministry of Jewish clerical work, psychotherapy, and energy healing—with a little jazz singing on the side. At 43, she’s based in Boca Raton, Fla., is the cantor for Temple Beth Am in Jupiter, and performs weddings for interfaith couples.

“I try to help focus on the universal aspects of Judaism,” she says of the thread that runs through her work. “Most people believe in gratitude and unity, and most Jewish prayers seek to invoke these things.”

Her backstory is laced with these themes, having trained with her mother, Cantor Ann Turnoff. “For thousands of years before the seminary was established, men became cantors by learning the craft from their father,” she says. “That has been my path, except it was my mother.”

She started early, singing in synagogue alongside her mother and eventually leading services on her own. By the time she was a teenager, Ferrari would work with congregations that needed a short-term cantor. (As a Haverford student, she recalls, she filled in for a cantor in Allentown for a few months.) Over time she expanded her practice to include a focus on interfaith couples.

It’s a specialty she came to via personal experience—her husband, Marcus Ferrari, is not Jewish. (They have two children, ages 4 and 7.) “I think it makes me more approachable for congregants who themselves have an interfaith marriage— they know I am not going to judge them,” she says. “And I think it makes me sensitive to the non-Jewish spouse, particularly when a child is becoming a bar or bat mitzvah or when they are standing under the chuppah to be married in a faith that is not their own.”

As she has embraced the sometimes-nontraditional needs of her congregation, they have helped her put a little Hiram back into her life in Florida. “My congregants knew that I liked to incorporate secular music in worship services, and they introduced me to the Joe Scott Trio in northern Palm Beach County,” she says. Ferrari got her jazz pipes back in full swing with the band, and together they’ve played local shows and put together a revue exploring the Jewish roots of the Great American Songbook.

Whether she’s singing a centuries-old prayer or a Gershwin tune, Ferrari still hears the root notes of her younger days singing alongside her mother and belting out Jackson 5 tunes with the Hiram crew. “As a kid, singing was my thing,” she says, “and now my hobby is my job. There’s nothing better than that.” —Brian Glaser

Music

When graphic novelist James Sturm wanted to put his new, wordless children’s book, Birdsong, to music, he didn’t have to go far to find a musician up to the task. Sonny Saul ’71 had been giving Sturm’s daughter, Eva, piano lessons for 10 years and had proved himself a talented, versatile musician and composer who understood kids. Moreover, Saul has devoted much of his life to books as the owner, for the past three decades, of rare-book shop Pleasant Street Books in Woodstock, Vt.

Saul and Sturm (who’s cofounder of the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, Vt.) Did their first performance of Birdsong in March at ArtisTree Community Arts Center & Gallery in Pomfret, Vt. They performed it again to a standing-room-only crowd during the Bookstock Literary Festival in Woodstock in July. “I’d like to take it on the road and do it all over the country,” Saul says. “It was a big hit and fun to do.”

Birdsong is illustrated in the Japanese art form called e-toki, which is more than 1,000 years old and was first used to convey morality tales. The book visually tells the story of two children who act unkindly toward a bird and then face surprising consequences.

Saul, 67, hails from Atlantic City, N.J., a “lucky thing for a human,” as he puts it. Lucky for Saul because as a kid he could roam through the majestic Victorian-era hotels that lined the Boardwalk (before casinos took their place) and discover jazz legends such as Duke Ellington and Count Basie playing live shows. Saul took piano lessons as a child, and the exposure to jazz gave his playing purpose and focus.

After graduating from Haverford as a religion major, Saul studied with music teacher Dennis Sandole, a self-taught genius guitarist and composer who famously taught John Coltrane. “I didn’t know that initially,” Saul says of Sandole’s relationship with the legendary saxophonist. “I probably would have been too intimidated to meet him if I did.”

Saul studied with Sandole for six years in Philadelphia before he and his wife, Sarah (they are now divorced), had children. “After that, I just couldn’t give it the attention it merited,” he explains. But Sandole had introduced Saul to other musicians in the area, so he played frequently and honed his skills.

“It was a nice little music scene that I left for Vermont,” Saul notes a little ruefully. His wife’s grandparents lived in North Pomfret, so they had visited Vermont annually, staying longer each time. When Saul realized he wasn’t going to be a renowned musician, he and Sarah decided to move to Woodstock full time. By then he had acquired a degree in library science from Drexel University, and he enjoyed touring bookstores in new places, so he figured he’d open his own.

Saul launched Pleasant Street Books in 1986 with his mother, who lived in the house attached to the shop and worked there until she was 88.

All along, Saul also taught local kids how to play the piano. He’d begun teaching children in Philadelphia, specializing in the 3-to-5- year-old set. Now, every week, he teaches 15 to 20 students of all ages on a white Yamaha piano that once belonged to jazz drummer Art Blakey.

More recently, Saul recorded piano and vocal duets with his daughter, Luette, a classical singer, and collaborated with his former Haverford roommate Don Denton ’71 on a self-published retelling of The Epic of Gilgamesh. Saul wrote the words and Denton created clay bas-reliefs that look like ancient Sumerian sculptures, which serve as the book’s illustrations.

“I don’t know of any comparable thing,” Saul says. “It’s really unique.” —Kirk Kardashian

Art

Creative inspiration is often described as a spark, but Christina Freeman ’05 recalls one of her most inspiring moments as an artist happening in the dark.

“I remember working in the darkroom and feeling like everything I was interested in, everything I cared about, could be explored through photography,” she says, recalling the epiphany that came during her sophomore year at Haverford. “I was interested in so many subjects; photography was the first thing I discovered where I didn’t feel like I was narrowing down by committing to it.”

Since that illuminating moment, Freeman, 33, has been an interdisciplinary artist, using various visual media and performance to explore ideas of community, collaboration, and conversation.

One early work, The Ring Project (2009), is an exemplar of her approach. “Dressed as a bride in search of her fiancé, I asked people on the streets of New York where I could find my soul mate,” says Freeman, who carried with her a giant sculpture of an engagement ring that she created. Behind the spontaneous conversations that she sought to spark was a cultural critique about the societal framing and invisible expectations of marriage.

Locations are important in Freeman’s work and tie into her lifelong passion for travel. A Spanish and Latin American studies major at Haverford, Freeman studied abroad in Barcelona during her junior year, and after earning an MFA at Hunter College in New York, she did an artist residency in Mexico City. She has mounted her work in Mexico, Bulgaria, and Greece—including Plums for Trash (2011–13), an “international trash exchange” that gave participants “an opportunity to consider their relationship to [the] cycle of production, consumption, and waste,” she says.

She now lives in Queens, where in August she presented Best Value Lemonade Stand (2016) at Flux Factory in Long Island City. Part of a live-stream exhibition in conjunction with Tom’s Etching Studio in London, the work featured an actual lemonade stand from which Freeman dispensed lemonade to gallery visitors. In exchange, she asked them to draw a picture of an object they owned whose symbolic, sentimental, or historical value exceeds its monetary value, and then name something that would be a fair trade for the object. Using an icon of capitalism (a child’s lemonade stand), the work opens up a discussion about value.

In addition to her artistic and curatorial practice, Freeman teaches art at Hunter, and has also taught at Haverford. She’ll return to campus for the spring 2017 semester to teach color photography as a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Fine Arts. And she always keeps herself open to the next idea or encounter that will spark new and unexpected work. “Art-making is traditionally a solitary, studio-based practice,” she says. “Choosing to leave works open to audience participation or collaboration with other artists forces me to be more flexible and take risks. My general belief is that something more interesting will happen when I am open to the unexpected— more interesting than if I am in total control.” —B. G.

Read the full article at http://www.bluetoad.com/article/Mixed+Media/2649817/360361/article.html.

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