Missouri Medical Review Fall 2009 : Page 34

PInPoIntInG ProGressIon new chair seeks cervical cancer markers The link between cervical cancer and the human papilloma virus is well-known, but could a woman’s genetic markers make her more sus- ceptible to developing the disease? Janet Rader, MD ’83, thinks so. It’s one of the reasons the gynecologic oncologist has devoted decades of her advancing career to cervical cancer research. In June, Rader was appointed chair and Jack A. & Elaine D. Klieger Pro- fessor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Medical College of Wisconsin. In addition to leading her department, Rader will lead the college’s develop- ment of a women’s health research program and a regional gynecologic cancer program while continuing her own research. She previously served at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, where she was a professor of obstetrics and gynecology and genetics. “The role of genetics has be- come so important in understand- ing cancer,” Rader said. “As I was finishing my residency, technology had advanced enough that genetics could really start to be used in cancer diagnosis and treatment.” In 1987, Rader completed resi- dency in obstetrics and gynecology at Michael Reese Hospital and Medical Center in Chicago. She went on to complete a research fellowship in molecular genetics and cell biology at the University of Chicago (Howard Hughes Medical Institute), followed by a fellowship in gynecologic oncol- 34 Missouri Medical review Fall 2009 ogy at The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. “When she was in her fellowship at Johns Hopkins, research wasn’t a requirement. She fostered that experience on her own,” said Premal Thaker, MD, a former gyne- cologic oncology colleague at Washington University. “There are very few people I know who perform research and stay clinically active. She takes care of her patients, teaches residents and fellows, and still per- forms her research. She’s also equally passionate about mentoring.” Since 1994, Rader has received continuous National Institutes of Health and American Cancer Society funding for her research. Her studies focus on early molecular changes in genetic predisposition and the iden- tification of biomarkers for the early detection and prevention of cervical cancer, as well as the development of novel therapies. “You absolutely need research to be a part of clinical care,” Rader said. “Clinical trials are incredibly important if you want to make ad- vances or improve the survival rate and quality of life of patients who have incurable diseases.” Rader also serves on numer- ous national committees related to gynecologic cancer, including the National Cancer Institute’s Gyne- cologic Oncology Group (GOG) Cancer Prevention and Control Committee, the GOG Committee on Experimental Medicine, the NCI Cervical Cancer Task Force Gyne- cologic Cancer Scientific Steering Committee, and the Cancer Genome Atlas Steering Committee. The NCI estimates that in 2009, more than 4,000 women will die of cervical cancer, and there will be more than 11,000 new cases of the disease. Rader credits the variety of “very clinical, hands-on” learning environ- ments she experienced at MU for helping her choose the right path to residency and her career. “I received exposure to a lot of patients, illnesses and experiences,” she said. In the end, it was the patients who helped Rader find her calling. “As patients go through diagnosis, treatment and follow-up, it com- pletely changes their lives and their families’ lives,” she explained. “These patients are someone’s mother, sister or daughter, and we should never forget that fact as physicians.” —Laura Gerding

Pinpointing Progression

New chair seeks cervical cancer markers<br /> <br /> The link between cervical cancer and the human papilloma virus is well-known, but could a woman’s genetic markers make her more susceptible to developing the disease?<br /> <br /> Janet Rader, MD ’83, thinks so. It’s one of the reasons the gynecologic oncologist has devoted decades of her advancing career to cervical cancer research.<br /> <br /> In June, Rader was appointed chair and Jack A. & Elaine D. Klieger Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Medical College of Wisconsin. In addition to leading her department, Rader will lead the college’s development of a women’s health research program and a regional gynecologic cancer program while continuing her own research. She previously served at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, where she was a professor of obstetrics and gynecology and genetics.<br /> <br /> “The role of genetics has become so important in understanding cancer,” Rader said. “As I was finishing my residency, technology had advanced enough that genetics could really start to be used in cancer diagnosis and treatment.” In 1987, Rader completed residency in obstetrics and gynecology at Michael Reese Hospital and Medical Center in Chicago. She went on to complete a research fellowship in molecular genetics and cell biology at the University of Chicago (Howard Hughes Medical Institute), followed by a fellowship in gynecologic oncology at The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.<br /> <br /> “When she was in her fellowship at Johns Hopkins, research wasn’t a requirement.<br /> <br /> She fostered that experience on her own,” said Premal Thaker, MD, a former gynecologic oncology colleague at Washington University.<br /> <br /> “There are very few people I know who perform research and stay clinically active. She takes care of her patients, teaches residents and fellows, and still performs her research. She’s also equally passionate about mentoring.” Since 1994, Rader has received continuous National Institutes of Health and American Cancer Society funding for her research. Her studies focus on early molecular changes in genetic predisposition and the identification of biomarkers for the early detection and prevention of cervical cancer, as well as the development of novel therapies.<br /> <br /> “You absolutely need research to be a part of clinical care,” Rader said. “Clinical trials are incredibly important if you want to make advances or improve the survival rate and quality of life of patients who have incurable diseases.” Rader also serves on numerous national committees related to gynecologic cancer, including the National Cancer Institute’s Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) Cancer Prevention and Control Committee, the GOG Committee on Experimental Medicine, the NCI Cervical Cancer Task Force Gynecologic Cancer Scientific Steering Committee, and the Cancer Genome Atlas Steering Committee.<br /> <br /> The NCI estimates that in 2009, more than 4,000 women will die of cervical cancer, and there will be more than 11,000 new cases of the disease.<br /> <br /> Rader credits the variety of “very clinical, hands-on” learning environments she experienced at MU for helping her choose the right path to residency and her career. “I received exposure to a lot of patients, illnesses and experiences,” she said.<br /> <br /> In the end, it was the patients who helped Rader find her calling.<br /> <br /> “As patients go through diagnosis, treatment and follow-up, it completely changes their lives and their families’ lives,” she explained. “These patients are someone’s mother, sister or daughter, and we should never forget that fact as physicians.” —Laura Gerding

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
 

Loading