360 West October 2013 : Page-109

EatDrink The dining scene Openings, closings and what’s on our radar new & notable Del Frisco’s Grille One of downtown Fort Worth’s most popular steak houses gets a sibling midmonth with the opening of the more casual bar and grill in the new Sundance Square Plaza. Located in the two stories of the revamped Commerce Building, DFG also features a large patio. The menu, which includes brunch, is less steak-centric, although meat lovers have nothing to complain about. Look for sandwiches and a variety of starters if you’re craving something lighter. 420 Commerce St., Fort Worth; delfriscosgrille.com. Happy Bowl II Fort Worth’s Cultural District gets a steady delivery of Thai food as Happy Bowl of White Settlement opens its second location this month. Owner Nutpisit Suthamtewakul (friends just call him “Oui”) promises the same popular menu, with few price increases. Generous portions of lunch specials that include egg roll, soup and iced tea are a steal at about $10. (Our favorites are pad Thai noodle with thick chicken shreds and pork-rich green curry, with coconut milk, bamboo shoot, red bell pepper, eggplant and basil.) Lighter options include spicy beef salad and spicy seafood salad as well as the sublime Thai standard, tom kha soup, a coconut-jalapeno-lime-swirled soup loaded with chicken. Oui will serve lunch and dinner daily; the )@6)WVSPJ`PZL]LUTVYLHWWLHSPUN^P[O*OPJV[ZR`»Z Liquor Store right next door. Oui plans to open in Southlake following the Fort Worth opening. 3431 W. 7 th St., Fort Worth. The kitchen staff is on view in the brightly lit space at the rear of Little Red Wasp. Bright cafe chairs add touches of color — and are comfortable, too. Little Red Wasp The hoped-for quiet opening of WineHaus Southside struck a chord with Lindsey Crawford, a Kansas City native who fell in love with Fort Worth upon moving here four years ago. Finding the sort of urban redevelopment that she appreciated in her OVTL[V^U
[OLMVYTLYÄUHUJPHSHUHS`Z[ decided this was a plum area for the wine bar and shop she quietly opened recently on Park Place Avenue. After taking a level one sommelier class and contracting with a regional wine consultant, Lindsey stocks WineHaus with Old and New World vintages. “I like the idea of bringing friends together over wine, and I want to build my inventory as customers tell me what they want to drink.” In the space vacated by Herringbone Home, WineHaus sits next door to Chadra Mezza & Grill, which will serve a menu to pair with wines. Look for a “funky French” interior, with decor Lindsey found around town at places like House of Wynn. Look for a grand-opening party during ArtsGoggle, Oct. 12. 1628 Park Place Ave., Fort Worth; 817-887-9101 or winehausfw.com. Compiled by Meda Kessler and June Naylor downtown’s new quasi-casual bar and grill was more like HTPUVYL_WSVZPVU^OLU3P[[SL9LK>HZW^LSJVTLKP[ZÄYZ[ customers a few weeks ago. Delivered on time by longtime restaurateur Adam Jones and designer wife Caroline Jones, the comfortable-but-chic sibling to nearby, elegant Grace buzzes at lunch, brunch and dinner. The clientele, dressed in everything from ball caps and work boots to heels and jewels, keeps barstools and bright red KPUPUNJOHPYZÄSSLKHUK the attentive, savvy staff Å`PUN;OLX\LZ[PVUVM why a Cobb salad costs $18 was answered with a taste. Chef Blaine Staniford (doing double House-made pastrami is sliced thin and piled duty here and at Grace) high with slaw in this two-handed sandwich. studs the capacious bowl with juicy, pasture-Photos by Ralph Lauer raised Windy Meadows chicken and Point Reyes blue cheese. Pickled peppers punctuate a light, yet satisfying, seared ahi tuna sandwich, while a big-plate star, the juicy short rib, A row of striped-back booths sits under WLYJOLZH[VW@\RVU.VSKTHZOLYZ^P[OIYPNO[NYLLUIYVJJVSPUPVU[OLZPKL DPLUURUHGZDOO&RQFUHWHÁRRUVDUH Brunch starters include a trio of fresh-juice mimosas and cheesy Southern polished, but scars show their age. biscuit with gravy and fried chicken, and gets serious with chilaquiles revved with Mrs. Renfro’s salsa. The beer selection wows, and the LRW specialty cocktail marries heat and sweet with reposado tequila, red pepper puree, mint, lemon and jalapeno honey. 808 Main St., Fort Worth; 817-877-3111 or littleredwasp.com. www.360westmagazine.com October 2013 109

New&Noteable

Openings, closings and what's on our radar

Del Frisco's Grille One of downtown Fort Worth's most popular steak houses gets a sibling midmonth with the opening of the more casual bar and grill in the new Sundance Square Plaza. Located in the two stories of the revamped Commerce Building, DFG also features a large patio. The menu, which includes brunch, is less steak-centric, although meat lovers have nothing to complain about. Look for sandwiches and a variety of starters if you're craving something lighter.420 Commerce St., Fort Worth; delfriscosgrille.com.

Happy Bowl II Fort Worth's Cultural District gets a steady delivery of Thai food as Happy Bowl of White Settlement opens its second location this month.Owner Nutpisit Suthamtewakul (friends just call him "Oui") promises the same popular menu, with few price increases. Generous portions of lunch specials that include egg roll, soup and iced tea are a steal at about $10. (Our favorites are pad Thai noodle with thick chicken shreds and pork-rich green curry, with coconut milk, bamboo shoot, red bell pepper, eggplant and basil.) Lighter options include spicy beef salad and spicy seafood salad as well as the sublime Thai standard, tom kha soup, a coconut-jalapeno-lime-swirled soup loaded with chicken. Oui will serve lunch and dinner daily; the BYOB policy is even more appealing with Chicotsky's Liquor Store right next door. Oui plans to open in Southlake following the Fort Worth opening.3431 W. 7th St., Fort Worth.

WineHaus Southside struck a chord with Lindsey Crawford, a Kansas City native who fell in love with Fort Worth upon moving here four years ago. Finding the sort of urban redevelopment that she appreciated in her hometown, the former financial analyst decided this was a plum area for the wine bar and shop she quietly opened recently on Park Place Avenue. After taking a level one sommelier class and contracting with a regional wine consultant, Lindsey stocks WineHaus with Old and New World vintages."I like the idea of bringing friends together over wine, and I want to build my inventory as customers tell me what they want to drink." In the space vacated by Herringbone Home, WineHaus sits next door to Chadra Mezza & Grill, which will serve a menu to pair with wines. Look for a "funky French" interior, with decor Lindsey found around town at places like House of Wynn. Look for a grand-opening party during ArtsGoggle, Oct. 12. 1628 Park Place Ave., Fort Worth; 817-887-9101 or winehausfw.com.

Little Red Wasp The hoped-for quiet opening of downtown's new quasi-casual bar and grill was more like a minor explosion when Little Red Wasp welcomed its first customers a few weeks ago. Delivered on time by longtime restaurateur Adam Jones and designer wife Caroline Jones, the comfortablebut- chic sibling to nearby, elegant Grace buzzes at lunch, brunch and dinner.The clientele, dressed in everything from ball caps and work boots to heels and jewels, keeps barstools and bright red dining chairs filled and the attentive, savvy staff flying. The question of why a Cobb salad costs $18 was answered with a taste. Chef Blaine Staniford (doing double duty here and at Grace) studs the capacious bowl with juicy, pastureraised Windy Meadows chicken and Point Reyes blue cheese. Pickled peppers punctuate a light, yet satisfying, seared ahi tuna sandwich, while a big-plate star, the juicy short rib, perches atop Yukon Gold mashers with bright-green broccolini on the side.Brunch starters include a trio of fresh-juice mimosas and cheesy Southern biscuit with gravy and fried chicken, and gets serious with chilaquiles revved with Mrs. Renfro's salsa. The beer selection wows, and the LRW specialty cocktail marries heat and sweet with reposado tequila, red pepper puree, mint, lemon and jalapeno honey.808 Main St., Fort Worth; 817-877-3111 or littleredwasp.com.

Munch Brett Oliver is an enthusiastic and healthful cook; her two preschool-age children snack on organic popcorn and kale smoothies. But during a 13-year career in financial compliance, her friend Abigail Flack found that shopping for and preparing school lunches took up precious time she'd rather spend with her son. The two became business partners over the summer, teamed up with local caterer Joey Diomede, and launched Munch, a school-delivery lunch service designed to take pressure off hard-working parents and provide healthy lunches to children - no nuts, added nitrates, high-fructose corn syrup, MSG, or artificial flavors or colors. One day it might be pasta salad with grilled chicken served with fresh fruit and carrots with ranch sauce; another day it's cheese, zucchini and squash quesadillas, with roasted corn and black beans on the side. Oliver and Flack began with service to three private preschools in Fort Worth. This fall they've expanded to four more. In the meantime, requests from preschool teachers and staff have inspired adult-size portions. New in rotation is a "Munchable," a healthful spin on the supermarket standard Lunchables. Oliver and Flack say Munch is more than a job, noting little faces that light up when they arrive with lunch, the early development of good eating habits, and knowing their service takes pressure off parents. Munch lunches range from $5.50 (child's portion) to $6.99 (adult's portion), with options to add organic juice, organic milk or bottled water; 817-668-6248 or yourmunch.com.

- Laura Samuel Meyn

Hog's Heaven You can celebrate Charles Huggins's homage to his late pitmaster father, Charles Sr., in every hickory-filled bite of tender pork ribs, tangy tangle of pulled pork and hefty chicken breast at Hog's Heaven.After two years of success on Weatherford's traffic- choked Main Street, the Huntsville, Ala., native moved his barbecue operation on Labor Day. The new location, in a shopping center alongside Interstate 20, better serves Hudson Oaks, Willow Park and Aledo clientele. You'll also find catfish on the entrees list as well as sides like baked potatoes and smoked corn on the cob. We like the thick barbecue sauce, more Memphis in texture but pure Deep South in foiling the brown sugar with vinegar and cayenne. Sweet tea is the drink of choice.There's plenty of dining room, but the whole menu is easily packed to go. 3290 Fort Worth Highway, Hudson Oaks; 682-333-0745.

Trio New American Catering

Jason Harper's buoyant energy makes it believable that the ownerchef of Trio can cater a charity cocktail bash for 4,000; a private, in-home dinner for 22; and an engagement party for a few dozen - all in one weekend, while running his busy Colleyville restaurant. Trio has just expanded its catering operation substantially by opening a sparkling new, spacious facility across the street from the restaurant. With a team of 20, including pastry chef-wife Miriam Harper and new catering director Cristina Mattoso, Jason aims to bring elegant food to weddings of all sizes, fundraisers, large and small dinner parties and business functions.Clients meet with Cristina and Jason in a pretty, sun-filled lobby over coffee or tea; smart ones will book time in late morning so afterward they can walk across the street and lunch on a field green salad with blue cheese, avocado, pecans and honey-chipotle vinaigrette and a Southern Reuben sandwich. Coming soon: hands-on cooking classes for up to 30 people. 8245 Precinct Line Road, North Richland Hills; 817-629-0879 or triocolleyville.com.

Epic Cones Because the drive to Dallas's Deep Ellum was less than fun, Chris Martinez moved his Epic Cones business close to home in southwest Arlington last month.Already, demand for his unusual pizza and other savory treats has boomed at the new locale. Using a newfangled specialized oven and press, Chris and his staff create and fashion savory dough into a baked cone, filled with pepperoni, marinara and cheese; Angus hamburger, cheddar-jack and smoked bacon; or hickory barbecue sauce, cheeses and pulled pork, for the Epic Cone pizza, burger or BBQ experience, respectively. Dessert cones, involving chocolate, strawberry or vanilla dough, take on fillings like apple pie and peach cobbler. Guests at Epic Cones can get a little basic shopping done at Epic Mart, an adjacent convenience store. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 4331 Kelley Elliot Road, Arlington; 682-587-4484 or epiccones.net.

Colleyville Farmers Market A prepaid organics program gives Colleyville customers access to fresh, seasonal organics without any long-term commitment. The Organic Box Program's offerings change each week but always include USDA-certified organic fruit and vegetables from local and regional growers. Contents will be 75 percent staples, which can include squash, cucumbers, peppers, apples, pears, broccoli, cauliflower, lettuce, celery, citrus, potatoes, onions and carrots as well as 15 percent seasonal and 10 percent specialty items. Place orders for a 10- or 20-pound box by 10 a.m. Wednesday for Friday afternoon or Saturday pickup. In addition, the farmers market offers nutrition-focused, chef-prepared meals crafted according to Fort Worth-based Cuisine For Healing guidelines. Menus change weekly and can be ordered online for Tuesday and Friday delivery.5409 Colleyville Blvd., Colleyville; 817-427-2333 or colleyvillefarmersmarket.com/prepaid_ organics.aspx. For Cuisine for Healing nutritional guidelines, visit cuisineforhealing.org.

In The Works

American F+B Tristan Simon's Dallas-based Consilient Restaurants completes its one-two punch next month with the opening of American F+B a block from its popular Fireside Pies in Fort Worth's West 7th devepment. Second largest of the company's restaurants - which include several Fireside Pies, as well as The Porch, Hibiscus and Victor Tango's in Dallas - the Fort Worth AF+B serves as a prototype for a very contemporary restaurant the company intends to reproduce elsewhere.The yearlong evolution of AF+B was due to Tristan's wish to "take time to really think all the elements through." He'll also take time with the preopening process, doing about 10 days of events in early November, with a projected opening midmonth. Seating 130 in two dining rooms and another 50 or so in the bar area, AF+B will have a staff of 100 to execute and serve meals at lunch and dinner daily, with a weekend brunch menu to come. The kitchen will employ a spit, smoker and wood grill and rotate in foods produced locally and regionally. "Our menu is our best effort to modernize, elevate and regionalize American bar-and-grill fare, with a little chophouse DNA woven into the mix. The cooking is definitely the most source-driven American genre in town, I think." At the corner of Crockett and Currie streets, Fort Worth.

Bird Cafe As work on Sundance Square Plaza continues, the space dedicated to the forthcoming Bird Cafe becomes functional enough for the kitchen staff to begin working (though not serving) this month. A portion of Shannon Wynne's newest restaurant - opening in the 1889 Land Title Building, his original Flying Saucer location - will occupy new construction, and that's where all the back-of-house operations will take place. Chef David McMillan of Colleyville, who's been running the food program at Wynne's Meddlesome Moth in the Dallas Design District for the past year, is excited about working in a big, brand-new kitchen, creating food to counter downtown's steak-house-heavy offerings. "It is more casual, but it's not the Saucer, either… .The food will be Fort Worth-driven; we have a smoker and a grill, and there are good vegetarian options, too." McMillan is building a wine list with a world mix of varietals, and the bar will offer 12 craft beers and three wines on tap. The historic section of the restaurant features original hardwood floors and new Moroccan tile work. A wraparound patio faces the newly pedestrian area of Main Street. The second floor is primarily dedicated to private dining, with a 500-square-foot deck overlooking the plaza's new park. Watch for an early November opening.111 E. 4th St., Fort Worth.

Matt's Rancho Martinez The newest Tex-Mex arrival in Colleyville happens to be one that's five generations strong. Matt's Rancho Martinez - descending from Matt's El Rancho, an Austin landmark with roots traced to the 1920s - comes to Tarrant County from Dallas' Lakewood neighborhood, with more recent openings in Garland, Cedar Hill and Allen. January 2014 will find Matt's anchoring one end of a shopping center shared by Whole Foods Market, at the corner of Glade Road and Texas Highway 26/Colleyville Boulevard. With 5,400 interior square feet (much of which can be open-air) and a 1,000-square-foot patio, Matt's can accommodate huge crowds hungry for distinctive signature dishes, including beef-and-guacamole enchiladas, smoked brisket burritos, stuffed zucchini and massive chicken-fried steaks topped with chili, cheese and onions as well as the Austin-centric chiles rellenos stuffed with beef and topped with tomatillo sauce, sour cream, mixed cheeses, crushed pecans and raisins. Next up is Matt's 8,300-square-foot edition in Roanoke's vintage downtown, opening summer 2014 across from the original Babe's Chicken Dinner House. Mattstexmex.com.

Village Kitchen In Highland Park Village, the formerly stodgy Village Marquee has been transformed into Village Kitchen, a casual restaurant with a comeas- you-are vibe and a menu to match. Gone are the tightly composed plates of seafood, foams and pricey steaks. In their place: ale-battered cod, flatbreads, roasted chicken, a kick-ass burger with housemade kettle chips and, for dessert, freshly made "cronuts" - sugar donuts made from croissant dough and worth every word of praise they will receive. "This is the kind of food every chef secretly wants to eat," says Andre Natera, VK's chef. 33 Highland Park Village, 214-522-6035 or hpvillage.com. Mesero Miguel Mico Rodriguez, the founder of Mi Cocina and owner of McKinney Avenue's Mr. Mesero, has taken over the former Alma space on Henderson Avenue and converted it into his take on contemporary Mexican cooking.

Mesero Miguel's two-story restaurant features a hodgepodge of steaks, combo plates and ceviches on a menu that ranges from halibut tacos to raw scallops to Waygu sirloin carne asada. 2822 N. Henderson Ave.; meseromiguel.com. Blue Bottle Coffee If everyone in the Park Cities seems to be vibrating, it's because their veins are coursing with Blue Bottle coffee, the San Francisco Baybased artisan coffee-bean roaster with a cultlike following.

Blue Bottle's organic, shade-grown beans are prized for their small-batch roasts, which are delivered to customers within 48 hours of roasting. Highland Park Village newcomer Number One, a juice and coffee bar, brews a mean cup of Blue Bottle. So will Green House Market, the bricks-and-mortar incarnation of Green House food truck, sprouting roots inside NorthPark Center now. Number One, One Highland Park Village, numberonehp.com or 214-520-0101.

Read the full article at http://www.bluetoad.com/article/New%26Noteable/1512247/176390/article.html.

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