Weber State University Magazine Spring 2012 : Page 24

The Big Handsome Football Player Alumnus Harry Diavatis shares the serendipitous story of how he met his wife, Sally Stringham, 46 years ago in Weber State’s Wasatch Hall. the Beautiful Little Redheaded Girl I wsu magazine | spring 2012 t was late February 1965 when I accepted a football scholarship from the Weber State Wildcats and moved from the San Francisco Bay area to Ogden. The following year — 1966 — I was hanging around Ogden in anticipation of the start of the football season. It was a very hot July day, and I was quite bored. Just for kicks, I drove up to the Wasatch dormitory, which housed dozens of young coeds. A bank of doorbells, which rang in all the various rooms, was prominently displayed on the wall, so with the attitude of “nothing ventured, nothing gained” and the haughtiness of youth, I pushed all the buttons, one after the other. The first couple of girls who came down weren’t my type, so I looked the other way as they peered around to see who might have rung their doorbells. A few minutes later my patience was rewarded as the cutest little redheaded girl appeared and said, “Did you ring my doorbell?” I replied in the affirmative and introduced myself. Her name was Sally, and she was an 18-year-old freshman enrolled in summer session. After a minute or two of preliminary “chit-chat,” I asked if she wanted to go out for a Coke and check out my new wheels, a beautiful 1962 Galaxie 500XL convertible that my father helped me buy a few weeks earlier. She sadly replied that she couldn’t 24

The Big Handsome Football Player and the Beautiful Little Redheaded Girl

Harry Diavatis, Alumnus

<i>Alumnus Harry Diavatis shares the serendipitous story of how he met his wife, Sally Stringham, 46 years ago in Weber State's Wasatch Hall</i><br /> <br /> It was late February 1965 when I accepted a football scholarship from the Weber State Wildcats and moved from the San Francisco Bay area to Ogden.<br /> <br /> The following year — 1966 — I was hanging around Ogden in anticipation of the start of the football season. It was a very hot July day, and I was quite bored. Just for kicks, I drove up to the Wasatch dormitory, which housed dozens of young coeds. A bank of doorbells, which rang in all the various rooms, was prominently displayed on the wall, so with the attitude of “nothing ventured, nothing gained” and the haughtiness of youth, I pushed all the buttons, one after the other.<br /> <br /> The first couple of girls who came down weren’t my type, so I looked the other way as they peered around to see who might have rung their doorbells. A few minutes later my patience was rewarded as the cutest little redheaded girl appeared and said, “Did you ring my doorbell?” I replied in the affirmative and introduced myself.<br /> <br /> Her name was Sally, and she was an 18-year-old freshman enrolled in summer session. After a minute or two of preliminary “chit-chat,” I asked if she wanted to go out for a Coke and check out my new wheels, a beautiful 1962 Galaxie 500XL convertible that my father helped me buy a few weeks earlier. She sadly replied that she couldn’t Possibly because she was “going with someone.” I had to think fast, so I said, “Hey, that’s okay. I’ll just be your big brother.” She bought that line, and we drove out to a drive-in on Riverdale Road for a Coke.<br /> <br /> I created many more excuses to see her in the ensuing days, and a couple of weeks later she broke up with her boyfriend. We were married in August 1968 and have three children and 10 grandchildren. Our children’s favorite story growing up was “The Big Handsome Football Player and the Silly Little Redheaded Girl.” Of course, when Sally told it the title changed to “… the Beautiful Little Redheaded Girl.” In truth, I’d have to agree with her on that. And you know what? Forty-six years later she’s just as beautiful.<br /> <br /> We’ll never forget Weber State and our serendipitous meeting on that glorious summer day.<br /> <br /> <i>While the brick and mortar of LaSal, Wasatch and Stansbury halls may be gone — with Promontory Tower soon to join them — the memories of what happened within those dorm walls, like Harry and Sally’s story, will live forever.<br /> <br /> Standing in place of the dorms is WSU’s new Wildcat Village, which will eventually feature three buildings. Hall One was constructed in 2011. Hall Two, or Stewart Wasatch Hall, will be ready for students to move into this fall. Hall Three will follow.<br /> <br /> Catch the fall 2012 edition of Weber State University Magazine to see how today’s students live — think Food on Demand — and make memories in Wildcat Village. You’ll also find even more alumni stories about the old dorms and the collegeday antics that went on inside (and sometimes outside) them.</i>

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