ACTE Techniques March 2012 : Page 24

COllEGE AND CAREER READINESS “As exemplified in Maria’s story, there is broad agreement that academic preparation is foundational, especially in an era when it is projected that, over the next decade, the share of jobs requiring some postsecondary education will rise to 63 percent (Carnevale, Smith and Strohl).” IlluSTRATION BY ISTOCk.COM century education initiatives, programs and teachers” and arriving at a “unified vision of college and career readiness.” In the spirit of this report, ConnectEd 1 and WestEd 2 have partnered to further clarify the definition of college and career readiness, based on the skills, knowledge and other competencies that research has shown are necessary for student success beyond high school—in postsecondary education, careers and civic life. The aim of our efforts was to synthe-size research and perspectives based on a holistic view of student needs and consid -ering long-range educational, economic and societal trends. In addition to review -ing the relevant literature, we consulted with educators and experts across a broad spectrum—each illuminating a critical piece of the overall picture. As exemplified in Maria’s story, there is broad agreement that academic prepara -tion is foundational, especially in an era when it is projected that, over the next decade, the share of jobs requiring some postsecondary education will rise to 63 percent, according to a 2010 report “Help Wanted: Projections of Jobs and Educa -tion Requirements Through 2018,” by Anthony P. Carnevale, Nicole Smith and Jeff Strohl. Academic preparation for college and careers is defined in various ways: by state academic standards, by reading and mathematics knowledge and skills as measured by the National Assess -ment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 3 , and, in many states, by the Common Core State Standards. 21st century technical skills and knowl -Using Real World Tools in the Classroom Virginia Tech engineering student Derek Lahr made his senior design project on his graduation present, a Tormach PCNC mill. “One of my research projects at Virginia Tech was to make a continuously variable transmission (CVT) for a bicycle. To get continuously variable ratios out of the transmission, one of the parts in the cam changes shape along its length. I needed a 4th-axis CNC with a rotary table to get it done. While I was researching ways to solve the problem on the bicycle design, I discovered the Tormach mill and saw that it had 4th-axis capabilities, was economically priced, and the right size.” For the Future While pursuing advanced degrees at Virginia Tech, Lahr continues to use his Tormach CNC mill, making award-winning robots for the Robotics and Mechanisms Laboratory (RoMeLa) program. www.tormach.com 24 March2012_TormachAdvertorial.indd 1 Techniques MARCH 2012 For more information on Tormach PCNC mills and accessories, please visit www.acteonline.org 1/12/2012 10:50:40 AM

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